Emanuel Sweert

Size: 10.2 x 15 inches - Original Hand Colored Copperplate Engravings

These magnificent and extremely rare hand colored copperplate engravings have been selected from a German/Dutch work entitled "Florilegium", published in Frankfurt in 1612 under the supervision of Emanuel Sweert(ius).

The Dutch florist Emanuel Sweert produced his '
Florilegium' at the behest of the Emperor Rudolf II of Austria. His combination of professions made him well-known among naturalists and botanists of the time. "[In the dedication] Sweert states that it was Rudolf II [Emperor of Hapsburg] who encouraged him to depict the more rare and unusual flowers in his collection and to have them etched in copper.

Six editions were published in Frankfurt or Amsterdam between 1612 and about 1647. The present flower prints are amongst the most beautiful of the images produced for the 'Florilegium': the flowers of 24 varieties are shown with brief explanatory text beneath each one, all beautifully arranged in ranks that echo the patterned precision with which they were grown by 17th-century gardeners.
Cf. Hunt 196; cf. Nissen
BBI 1920 &1922; cf. Stafleu & Cowan TL2 13.546
Emanuel Sweert (1552, Zevenbergen - 1612, Amsterdam), was a Dutch painter and nurseryman noted for his publication in 1612 at Franfurt-am-Main of Florilegium Amplissumum et Selectissimum.

Sweert lived in a period when new plants from across the world were being introduced to Europe via Dutch, English and French ships. To meet the burgeoning interest in plants by the public, nurseries were being established by wealthy merchants in order to meet the demand. Botanical illustration suddenly found a new outlet in the production of nursery catalogues. Sweert prepared his Florilegium as a guide of his available stock for the Frankfurt Fair of 1612.

The plates, depicting some 560 bulbs and flowers, were from the Johann Theodore De Bry Florilegium which in turn was based on that by Pierre Vallet. His attractively depicted bulbs sparked their popularity, leading to 6 editions of the work between 1612 and 1647, and a demand which would later result in "Tulipomania". At the time of the fair Sweert was in the employ of Emperor Rudolf II head of his gardens in Vienna. He borrowed freely from plates that had been published before, so that many of those that appeared in the Florilegium had been cultivated in Henry IV's gardens at the Louvre.

Florilegium
Clematis
Date: 1612
Price: On request
Print Code: Boswe012

Florilegium
Fritillaria & Lily
Date: 1612
Price: On request
Print Code: Boswe044

Florilegium
Lily, Lilium
Date: 1612
Price: On request
Print Code: Boswe045

Florilegium
Turk's cap Lily
Date: 1612
Price: On request
Print Code: Boswe049

Florilegium
Star-of-Bethlehem
Date: 1612
Price: On request
Print Code: Boswe057

Florilegium
Star-of-Bethlehem
Date: 1612
Price: On request
Print Code: Boswe058

Florilegium
Peony
Date: 1612
Price: On request
Print Code: Boswe064